BillyOh Pressure Treated Master Tongue and Groove Apex Shed

from £649
FREE Delivery by FRI. 29 Jan.*
Spend over £500 to pay on finance

BillyOh Pressure Treated Keeper Overlap Apex Shed

from £623
FREE Delivery by FRI. 29 Jan.*
Spend over £500 to pay on finance

BillyOh Pressure Treated Planthouse Potting Shed

from £749
FREE Delivery by FRI. 29 Jan.*
Finance from £19.79 a month (APR 12.9%)

BillyOh Pressure Treated Expert Tongue and Groove Apex Workshop

from £1,233
FREE Delivery by FRI. 29 Jan.*
Finance from £25.03 a month (APR 12.9%)

BillyOh Pressure Treated Expert Tongue and Groove Pent Workshop

from £1,119
FREE Delivery by FRI. 29 Jan.*
Finance from £21.75 a month (APR 12.9%)

BillyOh Pressure Treated Pro Apex Log Cabin

from £1,284
FREE Delivery within 20 Working Days
Finance from £25.58 a month (APR 12.9%)

BillyOh Pressure Treated Master Tongue and Groove Pent Shed

from £388
FREE Delivery by FRI. 29 Jan.*
Spend over £500 to pay on finance

BillyOh Pressure Treated Pro Pent Log Cabin

from £1,358
FREE Delivery within 20 Working Days
Finance from £27.17 a month (APR 12.9%)

BillyOh Pressure Treated Alpine Workshop Log Cabin

from £3,209
FREE Delivery within 20 Working Days
Finance from £47.91 a month (APR 12.9%)

BillyOh Pressure Treated Pent Log Cabin Windowless Heavy Duty Bike Store Range

from £1,074
FREE Delivery within 20 Working Days
Finance from £22.68 a month (APR 12.9%)

BillyOh Pressure Treated Traditional Log Cabin Workshop

from £2,915
FREE Delivery within 20 Working Days
Finance from £57.08 a month (APR 12.9%)

Pressure treated sheds are sheds that have been specially treated in our treatment tanks. The wood is submerged in a liquid preservative which seeps into the wood and provides it with a much greater resistance to rot and fungal decay.

Pressure treatment is usually performed by professionals and provides far more effectiveness than dip treating alternatives. There’s also no need to re-pressure treat a shed. Once it’s done, you’re left with a high-quality and moisture resistant product for years to come.

If you live in the UK, we’d advise it. Due to our temperate and often unpredictable climate, rain, damp air and moisture is a climatic unavoidability. Various earthly organisms, ranging from tiny bacteria and fungi to woodlice and insects, are naturally attracted to wood, but never more so than when it’s wet.

That’s why when you lift up a tree trunk or old plank of wood that’s been left lying on the ground, you’ll find a whole posse of creepy crawlies that have made themselves a new home, feasting on the wood for nutrients. Pressure treatment repels any of these potential visitors and keeps the wood in prime condition for many years.

Pressure treated wood can prevent rotting and wood damage for fifteen years or even longer. It completely eradicates the need for the customer to worry about protecting their shed.

While you can treat your building yourself at home, the pressure treatment process at our plants is done by professionals through an industrial process. Opting for our pressure treatment will save you time as otherwise, it’ll be down to you to ensure that you don’t forget to treat the wood yearly.

Moreover, the effects of pressure treatment cannot be achieved through shop-bought wood staining products.

While pressure treatment allows preservatives and chemicals to soak right into the grain of the wood, dip-treatment refers to the basic practice of treating wood with a water-based product to give it short-term protection from rot and bug infestation. It protects it on the outside, but the impact will fade over a much shorter period of time. This means it’ll need re-protecting at regular intervals.

Pressure treatment adds an extra layer of protection and a massive boost to help the wood fight off rot, but unfortunately it doesn’t make it waterproof.

In order to boost your wooden shed's water resistant qualities, fill any cracks or gaps with builder's caulking or expanding foam.

Yes you can. But if you do decide to take a brush to the wood, ensure it is completely dry by first splashing some water onto your shed's surface. If the water soaks in, it's dry; if the water runs off, then it's still wet.